Archive for the ‘Career’ Category

Three Good Questions to Ask at a Job Interview

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012

As a job candidate, you probably prepare for answering tough job interview questions. However, do you also prepare for what you ask the job interviewer? Your questions can be just as much of a “fit” indicator to potential employers as your answers are to their questions.

Never ask the interviewer anything about their company that you could have learned through research, e.g., the company’s website, LinkedIn, your library’s resources, etc. Companies want to feel special – that you have taken the time to determine if you are pursuing their opening because your interest is piqued based on your research, or if you’re just desperate for a job. Do your due diligence!

Here are three good questions to ask:

1) Why is this position open? (Is it a new one, or did someone leave? Why did they leave? Is there an internal candidate?)

This question tells the company that you’re serious about wanting this position. It also tells them that you are trying to assess your fit for the position, which you are. It’s important for you to know who the ideal candidate is for this job, based on who’s held the job before. If it’s a new position, then you may have some input into how the job is defined, if you’re hired. If there’s an internal candidate, then that raises many more questions in your mind, e.g.,  will the internal person have an edge among the competition? (Not good news for you.)

2) What is the most important (or biggest) problem you have that you want someone in this position to tackle?

This question tells the company that you’re already…

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Busting Free from the Control of Email

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Remember the 1980s movie, “Ghostbusters?” The plot involves a trio of ghost exterminators who try to save New York from supernatural doom when a river of slime grows unchecked under the city, threatening to obliterate humanity.

After 13 years of working in my virtual career coaching business, I admit that I’ve been “slimed” by the over abundance of emails – email drives my business and I am tired of it!

When I boot up my computer in the morning, the first thing I do is check my email. I get invigorated from the thrill of never knowing what awaits me. It might be a potential client’s inquiry, it might be a sign-up for my newsletter, or it might even be a new client contract! More likely, though, hiding behind cloaked headers are unwanted solicitations for anything from male sexual enhancement drugs to how to get my Santa letters addressed from the North Pole.

After reviewing 50 or more email headers in my inbox, deleting what I perceive as junk mail, saving my subscription newsletters for future reading, handling requests for information about my career services, and responding to clients who have emailed me overnight, whew! – I feel like I’ve worked a full day and it’s only 8 AM!

At this point, I’d probably be OK having invested only an hour or so into my email management. However,

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How a Resume Writer Writes the Best Resumes

Friday, August 10th, 2012

So you think it costs too much to hire a professional resume writer? After all, why should you pay a few hundred dollars for a quick typing job that you could do you yourself, right? If this is your belief, then I beg to differ with you. Let me show you why.

Anyone who has written his or her own resume will tell you that the process takes hours to produce a document that will get you a job interview. No, it is NOT a typing job – that’s the easiest part. Preceding the typing is the assembly of your employment, education, and other resume data; organizing it; selecting impactful action words and phrases to articulate it; choosing which accomplishments merit bulleted statements; designing the format and style (oh, you’re just going to use a Word template? Hmm..); rewriting it to fit into two or three pages (depending on certain factors); and so much more.

I’m sure you’ve heard that tons of people are searching for jobs these days. Without attention to the necessary details, your resume won’t pass the 10-second glance - the time a recruiter or HR person takes to look at your resume to see if it deserves further scrutiny. What does your resume say – and how is it said – to draw in the reader? Will your resume get picked to go to the second round? Mind you, we’re not talking about job interview here, only resume screening.

Here’s how a professional resume writer approaches the resume writing process after you hire him/her:

1) Gathering the resume data

Whether the resume writer provides you a questionnaire to complete, interviews you verbally, or does a combination of both, the goal is to extract so much information about your career and education that there is much more data than could possibly be included in a resume. What’s the purpose? A resume writer needs to know your job target and the supporting background you have to document it. A resume writer uses an objective eye to tie your experience

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Boost Your Job Search Effectiveness

Monday, August 6th, 2012

Has a state of exhaustion overcome your good intentions to stay focused on a job search? Many job seekers have been unemployed for months, if not years. Many are burned out, burned up and just plain tired. If that fits you, now is the time to re-examine your job search strategy and kick it up a few notches! Imagine a tired long-distance runner nearing the finish line. What does he do? Fall out of the race or dig deeper for the extra spurt of energy needed to cross that finish line?

Let’s look at some ways to enhance a job search that will help speed up your reemployment.

Boost Your Activity

How do you track your job search activities? Do you have a system in place to keep your contacts organized so you can methodically follow up on a regular basis? Do you set goals and reward yourself when you meet them? Organization is the only way to stay on top of all the activity surrounding a professional job search. Utilizing technology can save time and the support of a Career Coach can keep you on track.

Challenge yourself to increase the weekly contacts you make. If you currently reach out to three per day, raise it to ten. For anyone with sales experience, this tactic should be familiar. You up your chances for success by increasing your calls – it’s a numbers game. Track your average rate of return…you will need to collect your “no’s” to get a “yes,” but it only takes one “yes” to get a job!

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Career Coaching: The Core of All Career Services

Saturday, August 4th, 2012

As the phone rings, I set my timer for the career coaching session that is about to begin. Sally is always on time for her weekly career coaching calls, and I tell her how much I appreciate her promptness. Once we exchange pleasantries, I ask her what issue she wishes to focus on today. Although I had offered her fieldwork to complete after last week’s session, I ask her what issue is most important – perhaps the fieldwork will have to wait, as the client always drives the career coaching agenda and I let her do that.

Sally decides to discuss the fieldwork, an exercise on clarifying her work values and determining how they align with her company’s culture. It so happens that Sally is unhappy at her current company, or maybe it’s just her current position, or her boss. She’s not sure, and that’s why she has hired me. She needs a sounding board, a personal career trainer who will ask her the tough questions to help her figure it all out and determine which career changes she needs to make. She needs a career coach!

When Sally first contacted me she thought she just needed a new resume as she felt her only option was to enter a job search. Upon initial discussion with her, I quickly learned that she couldn’t define her job target, wasn’t sure of her skills, and was overall very confused. I explained the career coaching process and how it could help her…

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My Top 5 Business Email No-no’s

Thursday, April 19th, 2012

Some people say that email is going the way of old-fashioned letter writing, soon to be forgotten. Instead, we will all be communicating only with smartphones or some other technology not even yet developed. This frightens me as communication isn’t always about speed, but also about messaging. Complete, easily understood messages are the next best thing to phone calls or in-person conversations.

Doing business is a human interaction, not an exercise in technology. For now, many businesses have employees relate to each other through emails even if the recipient is a stone’s throw away from your cubicle. It is conceivable that you could be working on a project with a co-worker in the same building and never meet face-to-face!

This is all the more reason for thorough, but succinct, emails between workers. Business depends on your message being understood by all recipients – and so does your career! As humans, a few of us can read the same message but comprehend it differently. Be careful in not only what you say, but how you say it. Limit your use of emoticons.

Here are my top five email no-no’s to avoid in business:

1) Using any short-cut spellings associated with texting.

2) Misspelling names of colleagues and managers.

3) Assuming recipient(s) know what you’re talking about – explain.

4) Forgetting your manners – be polite.

5) Sending too quickly – do you really want to reply to all?

Interested in more email tips? Check out: 101 Email Etiquette Tips.

Your comments are welcome, especially if you have more email no-no’s to add to my list.

Wishing you career success in 2012!

Meg